Collaborating for a Cause: Autism
A Cord Blood Clinical Trial Underway

ViaCord supports Phase 1 Clinical Trial with Duke University Medical center to study safety of cord blood infusion in children with Autism.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of U.S. children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has sharply increased to 1 in 68 – up 30% from two years ago when the CDC estimated that 1 in 88 children had the disorder. The data also showed that ASD is almost five times more common among boys than girls:
1 in 42 boys versus 1 in 189 girls.1

ASD is a group of disorders characterized by “persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities.” Although the exact causes of ASD are still unknown, research suggests that both genes and environment play important roles. 2

For years, doctors and researchers have worked to gain a better understanding of this complex disorder that affects so many families.  Now an FDA approved Phase I Clinical Trial at Duke University is underway infusing patients diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder with their own cord blood stem cells – and ViaCord is proud to have provided financial support to Duke University for the initial funding of this Phase I Clinical Trial.

Advancements in Science. Growing Potential.
Helping to advance the potential applications of banked cord blood is a commitment ViaCord lives by, every day. For over 20 years, we’ve been committed to providing the highest quality, umbilical cord blood stem cell collections for families, and have been involved in cutting edge research to find new applications for cord blood and cord tissue stem cells.

How is the study set up?
Approximately twenty children (age of 24-72 months) diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, who have access to their own cord blood stem cells, have been enrolled in this early experimental study.  The goal of the study is to determine the safety of a single intravenous infusion of autologous (self) umbilical cord blood in pediatric patients with Autism. It’s also designed to identify which outcome measures best capture any impact these stem cell infusions might have on the child’s condition. Those measures may then potentially be used in a future randomized Phase II Clinical Trial.  For more trial details visit ClinicalTrials.gov

It’s important to note that at this time a sibling’s cord blood stem cells are not being used.  In addition, although the enrollment phase for this research study is complete, Duke University Medical Center will continue to collect contact information of families who are interested in being notified about potential future studies of this kind.  If interested you may contact the Duke study team at the following email address: cordbloodtherapyinfo@dm.duke.edu or call 844-800-CORD (2673).  

 

 

REFERENCES

[1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 68 children (or 14.7 per 1,000 eight-year-olds) in multiple communities in the United States has been identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Press Release: CDC estimates 1 in 68 children has been identified with autism spectrum disorder, Thursday March 27th 2014. 
http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0327-autism-spectrum-disorder.html 

[2] Scientists don't know the exact causes of autism spectrum disorder.
National Institute of Mental Health: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder? http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/autism-spectrum-disorders-asd/index.shtml 

 

4 Comments on “Collaborating for a Cause: Autism
A Cord Blood Clinical Trial Underway

  1. Please, let mr know if you ever are doing a study with sibling cord blood.
    Thank you do much,
    Briony Noome

    • Hi Briony. We do our keep our readers up to date with the most current research. And although the enrollment phase for this research study is complete, if you do have banked cord blood of a sibling, Duke University Medical Center will continue to collect contact information of families who are interested in being notified about potential future studies of this kind. If interested you may contact the Duke study team at the following email address: cordbloodtherapyinfo@dm.duke.edu or call 844-800-CORD (2673). Thank you,

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