Light It Up Blue For #AutismAwareness

Autism, a disorder that appears in the first three years of life, affects the brain’s development and impacts social and communication skills.While the exact causes of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are unknown, research suggests that both genes and environment play important roles. Read More

Cord Blood & Current Medical Treatments

CB Myth #3

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World Cord Blood Congress Europe 2015

ViaCord Speaker Spotlight

Novel Applications for Cord Blood: Exploring Regenerative Properties
Kate Girard, RN MSN, Senior Principal Clinical Affairs Specialist

We are excited to share that ViaCord’s own Kate Girard is not only attending,  but is also speaking at the Cord Blood World Europe Conference occurring in London this Wednesday and Thursday. We are excited that Kate is able to attend this meeting because it offers her an opportunity to educate other industry professionals as well as bring back valuable knowledge to the ViaCord research team.This conference is all about advancing cord blood medicine and learning about the latest developments in therapeutic applications for cord blood.  Over the course of two days, cord blood bank representatives, clinicians, and researchers will all gather together to discuss how to build deposits, reduce the costs of banking, and increase utilization. Read More

Autism and Cord Blood

Collaborating for a Cause: Autism
A Cord Blood Clinical Trial Underway

ViaCord supports Phase 1 Clinical Trial with Duke University Medical center to study safety of cord blood infusion in children with Autism.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of U.S. children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has sharply increased to 1 in 68 – up 30% from two years ago when the CDC estimated that 1 in 88 children had the disorder. The data also showed that ASD is almost five times more common among boys than girls:
1 in 42 boys versus 1 in 189 girls.1

ASD is a group of disorders characterized by “persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities.” Although the exact causes of ASD are still unknown, research suggests that both genes and environment play important roles. 2

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Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day

When you think about March you think of Spring, St. Patrick’s Day festivities and all of the green that comes along with it. Did you know the color green during the month of March also represents Cerebral Palsy Awareness?

Throughout the month people are encouraged to become better informed and more aware of cerebral palsy – a condition that affects approximately 1 in 323 children every year.1 Cerebral Palsy is a general term used to describe a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as body movement, learning, hearing, seeing, and thinking. 2  There are several different forms of cerebral palsy and the condition is most often caused by brain injury or an abnormality in brain development. This can be a result of trauma sustained in the womb or during the early years of life.

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MSCs Show Great Potential

MSCs Show Great PotentialImagine having a medical resource at your fingertips that could potentially help fight cancer, halt Parkinson’s disease, and neutralize juvenile diabetes.

Recent advances with a particular group of stem cells, called mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs, suggest they could be this resource within our lifetimes, potentially adding to other stem cell treatments already in use. This news is particularly exciting for expectant parents, because MSCs are abundant in umbilical cord tissue—the tissue that makes up the umbilical cord itself—and can be extracted and stored long-term.

Cord blood banking stores stem cells found in the umbilical cord blood, which is rich in hemapatopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These cells, responsible for producing blood and immune cells are immensely valuable—they’re used today in the treatment of dozens of diseases and are also being explored as a potential treatment for many others, including type 1 diabetes and cerebral palsy. HSCs are different from MSCs, however, so cord tissue stem cell banking goes a step further by capturing MSCs from the umbilical cord tissue, and cryogenically freezing them in case they are ever needed.

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